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PAST EVENTS

Sukey

Shawn Klein Lecture

Santa Barbara Jung Events

 

Click to Download the Flyer

 

 

Santa Barbara Friends of Jung
presents:

Robert Bosnak
Jungian Analyst, trained in Zurich

Author of A Little Course of Dreams, and Embodiment:
Creative Imagination in Medicine, Art, and Travel

C.G. Jung’s Red Book and the
Discovery of Embodied Imagination

Jung - The Red Book

Thursday March 3, 2011
7:00 - 9:00 pm
Montecito Library
$20 - Members
$30 - Non members
CEU’s available
Reservations: enantiodromia@mac.com

 

 

Santa Barbara Friends of Jung

Thomas Elsner, J.D., M.A. Presents

“Archetypal Patterns in Fairy Tales Seminar”

Thomas Elsner

Fairy tales use a symbolic language to express timeless psychological truths. Marie-Louise von Franz wrote, “Fairy tales are the purest and simplest expression of collective unconscious psychic processes.” Joseph Campbell called fairy tales, “the primer of the picture language of the soul”, and another commenter called them, “a grammar of fantasy”, and “the natural wisdom of the soul therapy of the ancients.”

The goal of this class will be to read fairy tales from around the world together and explore their archetypal images and dynamics from the perspective of Jungian psychology. You will learn something about archetypal stories, and at the same time something about Jungian psychology, about dreams, and about how all this may or may not relate to real life. Every week in this seminar we will read and discuss a different fairy tale. There will be plenty of opportunity for discussion and application. Both clinicians and non-clinicians are invited to attend. In addition to reading tales, we will also read a classic text by Marie-Louise von Franz, the preeminent Jungian authority on fairytale interpretation, The Interpretation of Fairy Tales.

Specifically for the first seminar: Reflect on the following question – what story was your favorite as a child, or scared you the most, or has stayed with you since childhood?

Dates: 6 seminars will be held beginning in January 2011
every other Tuesday at 6:00 – 8:00 pm:
January 11, 25
February 8, 22
March 8, 22

Cost: $300 for the three-month series.

Location: The offices of Thomas Elsner, J.D., M.A.
2020 Alameda Padre Serra, #211
Santa Barbara, CA. 93103
805 - 892-5151

CEU’s are available for this seminar.

Thomas Elsner is a certified Jungian Analyst who trained in Switzerland at the Center for Depth Psychology according to C.G. Jung and Marie-Louise von Franz. He is a training and supervising analyst at the C.G. Jung Study Center of Southern California and a core faculty member at Pacifica Graduate Institute. He teaches courses on fairy tale interpretation at both institutes. Thomas also has a private practice in Santa Barbara focused on Jungian analysis. His latest article, soon to be published in the upcoming Psychological Perspectives journal devoted to fairy tales, is entitled “Animals and Analysis: The Grimms’ Tale The Three Languages”

 

 

Santa Barbara Friends of Jung

Robert Romanyshyn Presents

“Individuation as Homecoming
Inner Journeys in the Outer World:
Stillness, Silence, Solitude and Serenity”

Robert Romanyshyn

Robert will discuss his encounter with the wilderness of Antarctica and share the resulting creative fire sparked by psyche’s response to the riveting experience. He will present his DVD, Antarctica: Inner Journeys in the Outer World, which shows the power of the Psychoid to bring us into a healing relation with the natural world. With images taken on a trip to the Antarctic in 2009, the DVD unfolds the grounds for a radical eco-psychology based in the power of this Antarctic landscape, to restore the broken aesthetic connection between the flesh of the human body and the flesh of the world. As it reveals the awe-ful Antarctic beauty of stillness and silence, it taps into the feeling function as, perhaps below the radar of mind, our natal bond to the world.

The making of this DVD also exemplifies the power of the dream in the process of individuation. This project began more than 30 years ago with a dream. It shows that while we might forget our dreams they do not forget us.

Date: Wednesday, December 1, 2010
Time: 7:00 - 9:00 PM
Cost: $20. Santa Barbara Friends of Jung Members
$25. Non-memebers
$30. Non-members 2 CEUs
Location: 22 W. Micheltorena, Suite A
Santa Barbara, CA 93101
RSVP: Lou Ann Wallner: orphanology@aol.com

Parking: Please park on the street, walk up the side driveway, and enter via the patio in the rear of the front building.

Robert Romanyshyn, Ph.D. is Core Faculty at Pacifica Graduate Institute and one of the first non-analysts elected an Affiliate Member of the Inter-Regional Society of Jungian Analysts for his scholarly contributions to Jungian studies. His most recent publication, The Wounded Researcher: Research with Soul in Mind, details the imaginal approach to research that he has developed at Pacifica. Most recently Dr. Romanyshyn gave a paper on research at the 2010 APA Convention.

Additionally, he has authored six books, contributed twenty-five chapters to edited volumes and published thirty-seven articles in professional journals. Recognized internationally for his writings, his books and articles have been used in various institutions and favorably reviewed in many professional journals. In 1993 he was chosen to be the first holder of the Amy Freeman Lee Chair in Humanities and Fine Arts at Incarnate Word College. Acknowledged for his teaching skills, he has been an invited lecturer and workshop presenter in the U.S., Canada, Europe, South Africa, Australia, and New Zealand. In 2006 he gave the keynote address at the New Zealand Association of Psychotherapy. Currently he is finishing two books of poems and has finished a multimedia DVD of his journey to the Antarctic in November 2009.

 

 

Santa Barbara Friends of Jung

Members Open House

Members are cordially invited to attend an open house in celebration of the season. This is an opportunity to meet the Board, view the offices for rent, and to share in a celebration and reflection of the approaching Solstice season.

The gathering will precede Robert Romanyshyn’s talk at 7:00 PM.

Date: Wednesday, December 1, 2010

Time: 5:30-6:45 pm

RSVP: Lou Ann Wallner: orphanology@aol.com

Location: 22 West Micheltorena, Suite A
Santa Barbara, CA 93101

Parking: Please park on the street, walk up the side driveway, and enter via the patio of the front building.

 

 

Santa Barbara Friends of Jung

“The Vision Seminars: A Reading Seminar”

"Surely you know that you can read a book many times - perhaps you almost know it by heart, and nevertheles it can be that, when you look at the lines before you, certain things appear new or even new thoughts occur to you that you did not have before. Every word can work productively in your spirit." (C. G. Jung, 2009. The Red Book)

Over a seven-week period we will explore The Vision Seminars, by C. G. Jung (Mary Foote, Ed.) The seven seminars that Jung conducted from October 1930 through March 1932 he explore his analysis of a woman patient, her dreams, and her artwork. These seminars are deeply related to Jung's own work as evidenced by the recent publication of The Red Book.

Wednesday, October 6 through November 17, 2010

Limited to 5 persons, priority will be given to members of the Friends of Jung

Cost: $200
$150for members of the Friends of Jung

15 CEU's available for MFTs and LCSWs

Please contact
Jean Palmer Daly, Ph.D., MFT,
805-962-2816

22 W. Micheltorena, Suite A, Santa Barbara, CA 93101

 

 

Paintings by Karen Lehrer,
on exhibit at Carr Winery

Thursday June 10, 2010
5:00 - 7:00PM
Informal talk: 6:00PM

Please join the SB Friends of Jung
for an informal Happy Hour at Carr Winery

414 N. Salsipuedes Street, Santa Barbara, CA

Karen Lehrer

Karen is an artist and licensed psychotherapist in Santa Barbara. The paintings which are on exhibit are from the Earthbound series. Karen will give an informal talk about these paintings which were in response to a very traumatic and serious accident, resulting in a near death experience, as a young adult. The trauma of this accident was very much alive in her psyche for many years, until she began the unstructured and self directed process of working through the trauma in the media of painting, about twenty years later.

 

 

 

Pacifica Graduate Institute is Pleased to Present

“Jung in Dialogue:
Practices of Soul Making”

June 11-13, 2010

www.pacifica.edu

 

 

 

As Part of Jung in Dialog,
SB Friends of Jung Founder Thomas Elsner, will be presenting

“Alchemy, The Red Book, and the Myth of Our Time”

Santa Barbara Jungian Analyst Thomas Elsner

The experiences of the alchemists were, in a sense, my experiences,
and their world was my world.
This was, of course, a momentous discovery.
—C. G. Jung

In the Epilogue to The Red Book, written in 1959, two years before Jung’s death and almost thirty years after he stopped his active engagement with that book, Jung wrote, “I worked on this book for 16 years. My acquaintance with alchemy in 1930 took me away from it. . . . To the superficial observer it will appear like madness. It would also have developed into one, had I not been able to absorb the overwhelming force of the original experiences. With the help of alchemy, I could finally arrange them into a whole." Alchemy was decisive for Jung because it became the connection between his personal experience of the archetypal imagination and its historical and archetypal roots. Jung rediscovered alchemy as “another Red Book," in other words, as a form of active imagination that initiates psychosomatic transformation through a creative encounter with the unconscious. This is why Jung’s work on alchemy infuses all his later writings. Today we can be informed by the images and writings of the alchemists and of Jung, much as Jung was informed, in our own search for understanding, meaning, and healing. The Red Book is the last great alchemical treatise, but anyone is an alchemist who gives expression to unconscious psychic processes and actively engages them.

Thomas Elsner J.D, M.A., is a certified Jungian Analyst, core faculty at Pacifica Graduate Institute, and a training analyst and past President at the C.G. Jung Study Center of Southern California. Born and raised in Southern California and trained as a lawyer, he left these roots to travel to Switzerland and study at the Centre for Depth Psychology according to C.G. Jung and Marie-Louise von Franz. There he wrote his thesis on Coleridge’s The Rime of the Ancient Mariner and developed a passionate interest in the patterns of the archetypal imagination as they appear in literature, folklore, and alchemy. Since that time he has lectured and taught on the subject of alchemy and depth psychology in Switzerland, England, and throughout the United States. His most recent essays scheduled for publication are “Alchemy and Socio-political Transformation" and “Animals and Analysis: The Grimms’ Tale The Three Languages."


 

 

As Part of Jung in Dialog,
SB Friends of Jung President Willow Young is Pleased to Facilitate

“Social Dreaming Matrix:
Dreams Speaking to Dreams”


Throughout human history, people have been telling dreams in community. This ancient lineage of dreams and dreaming carries great significance in many of the world's older cultures, and this lineage is trying to find voice in our modern world today. The Social Dreaming Matrix is an experimental container for sharing dreams and images arising from the deep psyche. This opportunity to share dreams, without interpretation, with a dream calling out its response through another dream or an image, helps us to see into each other and into ourselves in compelling and evocative ways. Sharing this process can seed our dreams and inner experiences for long periods to come, offering us inspiration and meaning. Optional social dreaming matrix sessions will be held on Saturday and Sunday mornings before the program begins and will be available on a first-come, first-served basis. The sessions will be facilitated by Pacifica core faculty members, Willow Young and Patricia Katsky.

www.pacifica.edu

 

 

 

Santa Barbara Friends of Jung is Pleased to Present

“A Spirit River Sojourn”

with Katie Sanford, MA, MFC
Friday June 26, 7:00-9:00 pm
Montecito Library, 1469 East Valley Rd, Montecito, CA.

With the advent of the Aquarian age we find that, to varying degrees and for growing numbers, individuals are turning inward in their search for a meaningful connection to the mystery of life.

“The pervasiveness of this evolution of consciousness was brought home to me when several decades ago, while working at the Jung clinic in Los Angeles, I spied a letter from the Spirit River Dream Analysis and Research Center located in a tiny settlement in the Peace River country in central Canada. In response to their request for some degree of affiliation with the C.G. Jung Institute in Los Angeles, my husband and I, as analysts, journeyed to this remote community to present lectures and films.

Among this small group of pioneering souls, one woman’s psychic commitment was so outstanding, as evidenced in her paintings and dialogues that I kept in touch with her over the course of her life. This presentation of her work is a testament to the power of the inner connection that enriched her living and supported her journey toward death.”

Katherine M. Sanford, M.A., M.F.C. is a Jungian analyst in Del Mar, California. She studied at the Jung Institute in the mid-1950s in Zurich, Switzerland and trained at the Los Angeles Jung Institute where she received her certification in 1978. Katie says her real education came through her travels in the inner and outer world, sixty-seven years of marriage, children, grandchildren and a great-grandchild.

The rendering of these life experiences is reflected in several papers- most recently The Muddled Milk of Motherhood (Psychological Perspectives, 2006), and her book The Serpent and the Cross; Healing the Split through Active Imagination (2006), which documents her archetypal journey through the individuation process. Katie has lectured nationally and internationally on issues concerning the feminine individuation process and is a founding member of the San Diego Friends of Jung, a member of the Los Angeles and San Diego Societies of Jungian Analysts. At 90 + years of age, Katie is a living treasure in the International Jungian community and a valued analysts’ analyst.


$15 members, $20 non-members.
Space is limited and reservations are recommended.

To reserve a space please send a check made out to Friends of Jung to:
Santa Barbara Friends of Jung ,c/o Lou Ann Wallner, M.F.T.
22 West Micheltorena Suite A, Santa Barbara, CA 93101

2 CEU’s for MFT’s and LCSW’s. - $10 processing fee for CEU’s

 

images by Katie Sanford

 

 

 

Santa Barbara Friends of Jung is Pleased to Present

“Our Inner Partners, the Anima and the Animus”

A workshop with Jungian Analyst
Katie Sanford, MA, MFC
Saturday June 27, 10:00-1:00 pm
Location to Be Announced


The evolution of consciousness calls for the individual man and woman to become responsible for the unique androgynous wholeness of the personality. These contra-sexual inner partners, the Animus and the Anima, play a crucial role in relating to the repressed Archetypal Feminine, spanning the split within the human psyche.

This workshop will focus on the Animus-Anima function, and explore ways to consciously employ these dynamic archetypal energies as a creative force within the individuation process.

Katherine M. Sanford, M.A., M.F.C. is a Jungian analyst in Del Mar, California. She studied at the Jung Institute in the mid-1950s in Zurich, Switzerland and trained at the Los Angeles Jung Institute where she received her certification in 1978. Katie says her real education came through her travels in the inner and outer world, sixty-seven years of marriage, children, grandchildren and a great-grandchild.

The rendering of these life experiences is reflected in several papers- most recently The Muddled Milk of Motherhood (Psychological Perspectives, 2006), and her book The Serpent and the Cross; Healing the Split through Active Imagination (2006), which documents her archetypal journey through the individuation process. Katie has lectured nationally and internationally on issues concerning the feminine individuation process and is a founding member of the San Diego Friends of Jung, a member of the Los Angeles and San Diego Societies of Jungian Analysts. At 90 + years of age, Katie is a living treasure in the International Jungian community and a valued analysts’ analyst.


$30 for members, $45 for non-members.
Space is limited and reservations are recommended.

To reserve a space please send a check made out to Friends of Jung to:
Santa Barbara Friends of Jung ,c/o Lou Ann Wallner, M.F.T.
22 West Micheltorena Suite A, Santa Barbara, CA 93101

2 CEU’s for MFT’s and LCSW’s. - $10 processing fee for CEU’s

images by Katie Sanford

 

 

Santa Barbara Friends of Jung is Pleased to Present:


Dr. Michael Geiss

Aliveness and Deadness:
The Impact of These Forces on Both The Therapist
and Patient During Psychotherapy

Wednesday May 20th, 7:00-9:00 pm
Montecito Library, 1469 East Valley Rd, Montecito, CA.

The deep life in a patient referred to as their true self or soul often acts as if it were a separate, second self in psychotherapy, one that emerges from out of an unknown region to risk presencing and engaging the therapist.

Nevertheless, these spontaneous gestures of aliveness are frequently defused and erased by powerful sources of resistance to their emergence. It's as if a patient has guardians that act to reestablish the "safety" of at least a known living-death in the form of their usual personality.There is real value when a therapist tracks within himself and his patient those moments when a vital aliveness in their connection is lost and a familiar sense of futility and meaninglessness reestablishes itself.

The tracking of such cycles of aliveness to deadness to aliveness within both patient and therapist so that this process can be felt, seen, and expressed helps bring into focus an immensely important issue often affecting both of them: a fear of life itself.

Michael Geis,M.D. is an adult and child psychiatrist in private practice in Santa Barbara. Now a faculty member of SBCC's Continuing Education Division, he teaches classes on the soul as seen from the perspectives of psychology, philosophy, and poetry.


$15 members, $20 non-members.
Space is limited and reservations are recommended.

To reserve a space please send a check made out to Friends of Jung to:
Santa Barbara Friends of Jung ,c/o Lou Ann Wallner, M.F.T.
22 West Micheltorena Suite A, Santa Barbara, CA 93101

2 CEU’s for MFT’s and LCSW’s. - $10 processing fee for CEU’s

We look forward to seeing you there!

 

 

Santa Barbara Friends of Jung
Presents

"RE-IMAGINING EDUCATION:
REVIVING THE SOUL OF LEARNING"


with Dennis Slattery
Wednesday April 22, 7:00-9:00 pm
Montecito Library, 1469 East Valley Rd, Montecito, CA.

Dennis Slattery

 

A new book co-edited by Dennis Patrick Slattery and Jennifer Leigh Selig entitled REIMAGINING EDUCATION: ESSAYS ON REVIVING THE SOUL OF LEARNING (Spring Journal Books, 2009) asks a fundamental question of the contributors: what do you present in the classroom to reinstill the presence of the imagination? The project grows directly out of frustration over the previous administration's NO CHILD LEFT BEHIND initiative, which turned into code for quantifying all aspects of learning.

Dr. Slattery's talk will use parts of his preface to entertain the place of divinity in learning, the mystery of the classroom as sacred space, the place of non-directed thinking to access deeper sluices of the psyche, and the role of teacher as midwife, guide, and learner. A book signing will follow his presentation.

Bio: Dennis Patrick Slattery, Ph.D. is core faculty at Pacifica Graduate Institute (14 years) and has been teaching for 40 years, first in Special Education classes grades 1-6, then secondary school, undergraduate and graduate education as well as teaching teachers the classics of Western Literature at the Dallas Institute of Humanities and Culture's two summer program for high school teachers, now in its 26th. year. He is the author of 13 books, dozens of articles and book reviews on culture, psyche, literature, myth and spirituality. He offers workshops across the country and in Europe on riting one's personal myth through the thought of Joseph Campbell.

 


$15 members, $20 non-members.
Space is limited and reservations are recommended.

To reserve a space please send a check made out to Friends of Jung to:
Santa Barbara Friends of Jung ,c/o Lou Ann Wallner, M.F.T.
22 West Micheltorena Suite A, Santa Barbara, CA 93101

2 CEU’s for MFT’s and LCSW’s. - $10 processing fee for CEU’s

 

 

Santa Barbara Friends of Jung
Presents

"UFOs and Crop Circles: Some Reflections on
Jung's Theory of Continuing Creation"


with Veronica Goodchild
Wednesday March 18, 7:00-9:00 pm
Montecito Library, 1469 East Valley Rd, Montecito, CA.

Veronica Goodchild

This talk explores Jung's later creative work concerning the unfolding of a new paradigm of reality. He notes that as physics penetrates into the mysteries of sub-atomic matter and depth psychology explores the regions of consciousness beyond the collective psyche, that a world of subtle bodies comes alive again. I suggest that UFOs, crop circles, near-death experiences, Marian visions, and other paranormal phenomena might be expressions of this subtle, in-between, imaginal world, and that such experiences could be both symptoms (when not understood) and signatures (when we make the effort to reflect) of an emerging consciousness as we move from the aeon of Pisces to the so-called new age (or Platonic month) of Aquarius. I also describe some of the unique psychological features of such experiences and how often they help the experiencer move from a logos-centered life to an eros, or heart-centered world that Jung describes in his alchemy studies as "union with the unus mundus."

Veronica Goodchild, PhD, is a professor of Jungian Psychotherapy and Imaginal Psychology at Pacifica Graduate Institute. She received her PhD from Pacifica (1998) and has a Masters in Clinical Social Work from Columbia University, NYC (1980). Growing up in the UK, she has practiced as a Jungian psychotherapist for almost 30 years. Veronica is the author of numerous articles as well as her book, Eros and Chaos: The Sacred Mysteries and Dark Shadows of Love (Nicolas-Hays, 2001). She has a forthcoming new book titled, The Songlines of the Soul: A New Vision for a New Century, that explores in detail many of the points of her lecture.

Veronica lives in Summerland CA. with her husband Robert Romanyshyn.

Veronica Goodchild - Eros and Chaos


$15 members, $20 non-members.
Space is limited and reservations are recommended.

To reserve a space please send a check made out to Friends of Jung to:
Santa Barbara Friends of Jung ,c/o Lou Ann Wallner, M.F.T.
22 West Micheltorena Suite A, Santa Barbara, CA 93101

2 CEU’s for MFT’s and LCSW’s. - $10 processing fee for CEU’s

 

 

Special Event:

Pacifica Graduate Institute

Presents

“The Way of the Dream:
Conversations on Jungian Dream Interpretation
with Marie-Louise Von Franz"

In ten hours of rare footage, Marie-Louise von Franz discusses with Jungian analyst Fraser Boa the meaning of dreams in an age desperate for the wisdom that our dreams provide. As von Franz puts it: "Dreams show us how to find meaning in our lives, how to fulfill our own destiny, and how to realize the greater potential of life within us."Marion Woodman

This film series has been newly digitized with commentary by Marion Woodman. At the CJ Jung Center event -- over the course of two days -- MARION WOODMAN WILL BE PRESENT to discuss with audience members their responses to this gripping material.

Fraser Boa filmed first-person accounts of dreams from ordinary men and women around the world. He then asked Marie-Louise von Franz to comment upon these dreams as if in a private analytic session. The result is insight into the unconscious parts of ourselves, our relationships, our approach to death, and the historical significance of dreaming. To sit with Dr. von Franz for so many hours in spontaneous interview allows one to feel the depth of her knowledge, her special genius. It puts us in touch with that bit of genius within each of us. Indeed, "The Way of the Dream" helps us to dream.


Pacifica Graduate Institute Event:

WHEN: Friday, January 30, 4:00 - 9:30 pm
Saturday, January 31, 9:00 am - 5:30 pm
Sunday, February 1, 9:00 am - 12:30 pm

WHERE: Pacifica Graduate Institute. 249 Lambert Road, Carpinteria, CA 93013

CLICK HERE TO REGISTER

TICKETS:
$370 General Admission
$320 Special Admission (Full-time Students, Pacifica Alumni, & seniors)
$295 Active Pacifica Students
Fees include Friday dinner; Saturday breakfast, lunch & dinner; and Sunday breakfast and lunch

C.G. Jung was a pioneer in dream research, and his work with dreams and symbols formed the basis of his work. Jung found that through dreams people awaken to who they really are. Marie-Louise von Franz began her analytic relationship with Jung when she was 18 and worked with him throughout her life. Dr. von Franz concluded that one of the healthiest things people can do is pay attention to their dreams.

This seminar is based on a screening of The Way of the Dream, an extraordinary series of films made in the middle of the last century by Jungian analyst Fraser Boa. He filmed first-person accounts of dreams from ordinary men and women around the world, and asked Dr. von Franz to interpret them as she would in a private analytical session. The result is ten hours of rare footage, newly digitized, explaining and demonstrating the art and science of dream analysis from a Jungian perspective. The material covers what dreams tell us about the unconscious, about death and dying, and the historical significance of dreams and symbols. Seeing Dr. von Franz in live interviews allows one to grasp the depth of her knowledge and experience the spontaneity and immediacy of her presence and genius.

Marion Woodman, the sister of Fraser Boa, will guide us through this extraordinary footage and engage us in discussion. She will be joined by Ross Woodman and Stephen Aizenstat.


 

 

Santa Barbara Friends of Jung
Presents

“The Melting Polar Ice;
A Jungian-Archetypal perspective on Global Warming”


with Robert Romanyshyn
Wednesday January 14, 7:00-9:00 pm
Montecito Library, 1469 East Valley Rd, Montecito, CA.

Mary Shelley's 19th c. novel Frankenstein ends with the creature moving into the frozen landscapes of the polar regions, where he intends to immolate himself. Victor Frankenstein's creation was both an early diagnosis of the excesses of the technological mind cut off from nature and a prophecy. Jung has noted that what we do not make conscious in ourselves we meet as our fate in the world. In this talk I will examine some aspects of this novel as well as several other 19th.c literary pieces within the context of Jungian-Archetypal psychology to demonstrate how the melting polar ice is a shadow of the technological mind that has taken leave of its senses. To address the crisis of global warming will require more than a political response. It will also require a radical psychological revolution.

Robert D. Romanyshyn is a Senior Core Faculty Member in the Clinical Program at Pacifica Graduate Institute and an Affiliate Member of the Inter-Regional Society of Jungian Analysts. Robert has lectured at numerous professional societies and university programs in the U. S., Europe, Africa, Australia, Canada, and New Zealand. He has published six books, has contributed scores of chapters to edited volumes, published numerous articles in professional psychological and literary journals and has written numerous book reviews. His latest book, The Wounded Researcher, was published in Sept. 2007. His other titles include Ways of the Heart: Essays toward an Imaginal Pschology (2002), Mirror and Metaphor: Images and Stories of Psychological Life (2001), The Soul in Grief: Love, Death and Transformation (1999), Technology as Symptom and Dream (1989/2000), and Psychological Life: From Science to Metaphor (1982).

Robert lives in Summerland CA. with his wife Veronica Goodchild.

Maureen Murdock


$15 members, $20 non-members.
Space is limited and reservations are recommended.

To reserve a space please send a check made out to Friends of Jung to:
Santa Barbara Friends of Jung ,c/o Lou Ann Wallner, M.F.T.
22 West Micheltorena Suite A, Santa Barbara, CA 93101

2 CEU’s for MFT’s and LCSW’s. - $10 processing fee for CEU’s

 

 

Santa Barbara Friends of Jung
Presents

“Evolution of the Image of the Divine Feminine”


with Maureen Murdock
Wednesday December 10, 7:00-9:00 pm
Montecito Library, 1469 East Valley Rd, Montecito, CA.

If we believe, as Jung did, that the whole history of the human race is in some ways always alive in the psyche, we can reclaim images of the Divine Feminine, which is an eternal archetype. She has shown herself to us from the earliest times of our civilization in cave paintings and primitive sculptures, in the great mythologies, and she appears in many guises in our present cultures. She is part of the fabric of our very being. In this slide lecture we will look at images of the Divine Feminine throughout recorded history from Paleolithic times to the present to remind us of how she is alive within each of us today. We will also focus on particular Black Madonna images from Le Puy, Rocamadour, Montserrat, Czestohowa, and Einsiedeln visited by Murdock on pilgrimage.

Maureen Murdock, M.A., MFT, is a depth psychotherapist in private practice in Santa Barbara and was Chair and Core Faculty of the MA Counseling Psychology Program at Pacifica Graduate Institute She is the author of the best-selling book, The Heroine’s Journey, as well as the newly revised Fathers’ Daughters: Breaking the Ties that Bind; Unreliable Truth: On Memoir and Memory; Spinning Inward: Using Guided Imagery with Children; and The Heroine’s Journey Workbook. She edited a anthology entitled Monday Morning Memoirs: Women in the Second Half of Life and her books have been translated into a dozen languages. She gives lectures and workshops internationally.

Please feel welcome to bring you own images of the Divine Feminine to put on our altar during the evening presentation.

Maureen Murdock


$15 members, $20 non-members.
Space is limited and reservations are recommended.

To reserve a space please send a check made out to Friends of Jung to:
Santa Barbara Friends of Jung ,c/o Lou Ann Wallner, M.F.T.
22 West Micheltorena Suite A, Santa Barbara, CA 93101

2 CEU’s for MFT’s and LCSW’s. - $10 processing fee for CEU’s

 

 

Santa Barbara Friends of Jung
Presents

“The Chumash Dream Helpers”


with Jean Palmer-Daley, Ph.D.
Wednesday November 12, 7:00-9:00 pm
Montecito Library, 1469 East Valley Rd, Montecito, CA.

Jean will discuss the Chumash tradition of dream helpers. Dream helpers were dream figures with whom individuals formed personal relationships. These relationships provided the individuals with protection and guidance in much the same way that our dream figures can assist us. We will discuss how the dream helper relationships were obtained and tales of dream helpers' assistance. In addition, the dream helper relationship will be examined from a Jungian perspective. Participants will be invited to share their dreams and how dream figures have assisted them.

Jean Palmer-Daley Ph.D. is an MFT and training as a Jungian Analyst at the Center for Depth Psychology according to C.G. Jung and Marie-Louise von Franz in Zurich, Switzerland. She is adjunct faculty member of Pacifica Graduate Institute with a private practice here in Santa Barbara.

 


$15 members, $20 non-members.
Space is limited and reservations are recommended.

To reserve a space please send a check made out to Friends of Jung to:
Santa Barbara Friends of Jung ,c/o Lou Ann Wallner, M.F.T.
22 West Micheltorena Suite A, Santa Barbara, CA 93101

2 CEU’s for MFT’s and LCSW’s. - $10 processing fee for CEU’s

 

 

Santa Barbara Friends of Jung
Presents

“The Serpent and the Cross;
Healing the Split through Active Imagination
.”


with Katie Sanford, MA, MFC
Wednesday August 13, 7:00-9:00 pm
Montecito Library, 1469 East Valley Rd, Montecito, CA.

Katherine M. Sanford, M.A., M.F.C. is a Jungian analyst in Del Mar, California. She studied at the Jung Institute in the mid-1950s in Zurich, Switzerland and trained at the Los Angeles Jung Institute where she received her certification in 1978. Katie says her real education came through her travels in the inner and outer world, sixty-seven years of marriage, children, grandchildren and a great-grandchild. The rendering of these life experiences is reflected in several papers- most recently The Muddled Milk of Motherhood (Psychological Perspectives, 2006), and her book The Serpent and the Cross; Healing the Split through Active Imagination (2006), which documents her archetypal journey through the individuation process. Katie has lectured nationally and internationally on issues concerning the feminine individuation process and is a founding member of the San Diego Friends of Jung, a member of the Los Angeles and San Diego Societies of Jungian Analysts.

"My recently published book, The Serpent and the Cross; Healing the Split through Active Imagination (2006,) contains 62 archetypal paintings and related commentaries dealing with the early loss of my mother and the compensatory responses to that loss. This is the documentation of a thirty year journey of intense inner work on the individuation process."

"This lecture will focus on the first 23 paintings, images dealing specifically with the development of a more positive relationship to the animus, putting him to work in support of my feminine authenticity. Personal narrative accompanies these paintings, giving insight and interpretation to the symbols and themes that have defined women since time began. This series of images and text represent a dialogue with the soul, addressing the deepest complexes of the human psyche."


$15 members, $20 non-members.
Space is limited and reservations are recommended.

To reserve a space please send a check made out to Friends of Jung to:
Santa Barbara Friends of Jung ,c/o Lou Ann Wallner, M.F.T.
22 West Micheltorena Suite A, Santa Barbara, CA 93101

2 CEU’s for MFT’s and LCSW’s. - $10 processing fee for CEU’s

images by Katie Sanford

 

 

Santa Barbara Friends of Jung
Presents

Celebrate Jung's Birthday
July 26th
a special event for members only

Come join us at the Hollister Ranch, about 30 minutes up the coast from Santa Barbara; an extraordinarily beautiful stretch of coastal land and a place that is intimately related to our Santa Barbara Jungian heritage. The Hollister Ranch was the birthplace of Jane Hollister who, with her husband Jo Wheelwright, were some of the first Americans to train with Jung in Switzerland as Analysts. Jane and Jo founded the Jung Institute in San Francisco and were widely regarded around the world as extraordinary analysts and persons.

This event is in honor of Jung on his birthday, and also in honor of our Santa Barbara links to the Jungian legacy through Jane and Jo Wheelwright and the land that was so close to their souls.

Doyle Hollister, a relative of Jane Hollister and a therapist in town, will present a piece about Jane, his relationship with her and his life as a Hollister. Lou Ann Wallner, a member of the board of the Friends of Jung and long-time Hollister Ranch resident, will talk about her long-standing relationships with Jane and Jo, and share from the deep well of stories she carries with her about them and their lives and their connection to Jung.

This will be a beautiful event to honor both Jung and the Hollister-Wheelwrights.

For the Board I hope that you will be able to attend and join us for this community building event. We look forward to seeing you there!

TIME: Sat. July 26th 11:00 - 3:00
PLACE: Hollister Ranch, Gaviota CA (Directions will be provided to those attending. It is about 30 min from Santa Barbara. Think carpool if possible.)
COST: We are currently adding up costs! and will keep the cost to the bare minimum. We'll let you know but wanted to make sure you save the date if you are interested.

LUNCH, BEVERAGES, AND BIRTHDAY CAKE TO BE PROVIDED BY SANTA BARBARA FRIENDS OF JUNG

SPACES ARE LIMITED DUE TO USE RESTRICTIONS SO PLEASE RESERVE A SPACE ASAP IF YOU WOULD LIKE TO ATTEND!! AGAIN, IT IS FOR MEMBERS ONLY SO YOU MUST BE A MEMBER TO ATTEND. PERSONS WHO WOULD LIKE TO ATTEND BUT ARE NOT YET MEMBERS ARE WELCOME TO JOIN BEFORE ATTENDING.


To reserve a space please contact Lou Ann Wallner at:
orphanology@aol.com
or
22 West Micheltorena Suite A, Santa Barbara CA 93101


Keep posted at www.santabarbarajung.com for further information about this and other upcoming events.

Best wishes, and if you have any questions please contact me at: telsner@cox.net or Lou Ann at: orphanology@aol.com

Tom Elsner


 

 

Santa Barbara Friends of Jung
Presents

“St. Francis: A Madman who was Wise
or
a Wise Man who was Mad?”

A Psycho-Spiritual Biography


with Dr. David Bona, Phd
Wednesday June 18, 7:00-9:00 pm
Montecito Library, 1469 East Valley Rd, Montecito, CA.

It is November 11, 1202; Francis of Assisi is riding out of the city with the other young men to do battle with the neighboring town of Perugia. He stands out from all the others, not because of his stature or his fighting reputation, but because of the magnificence of his horse, the quality of his weapons, and the lavishness of his clothes. They were the best money could buy.

Francis is the son of one of the richest men of Assisi. He is young, privileged, and fun loving, personable and known as “the King Of Revelers”. It is the best of times for Francis. We see his father and mother cheering him on to glory, so proud of their son, celebrating his dreams and their hopes for him.

Five years later Francis is standing in the crowded town square before his father and the Bishop of Assisi. His father is so angry with him that he is about to disown him publicly. Francis quietly, yet full of determination, takes off all of his clothes and stands naked before the people of Assisi. Handing his clothes back to his father, he says, “Pietro Bernadone is no longer my father. Now I say with complete freedom ‘Our Father who art in heaven’”.

Twenty years later Francis is on a mountaintop deep in prayer. Suddenly a ball of fire streams down from the heavens. A fiery angel imaged as Jesus nailed to the cross stands before him. Francis is filled with both debilitating terror and immense joy. Rays of light from the angel, like bolts of lightening, pierce his hands, feet and side. Searing pain knocks him unconscious. When he awakes the stigmata, the five wounds of Christ’s crucifixion, are permanently imprinted on his body.

What happened to that carefree, rich young man who rode out so gloriously to do battle? What mysterious psychological/spiritual forces were operating in Francis that led him to strip himself naked and disown his father? What was the architecture of his soul? How did Francis of Assisi come to be considered one of the world’s greatest saints? Why is his life so important to all men and women in every age, culture and religion?

These are some of the questions that Dr. David Bona engages in his lively presentation of the life of St. Francis of Assisi.

Dr. Bona spent 25 years as a Capuchin-Franciscan Catholic Priest and has an MA in Theology, an MA in Divinity, an MA in Education and a Ph.D. in Clinical Psychology. He wrote his dissertation on the Dreams of St. Francis and, is currently working on a book of Francis’s life from the perspective of psychology. He has served as the Chair of the MA/Ph.D Depth Psychology Program at Pacifica Graduate Institute in Santa Barbara, California. He is currently a Core Faculty Member at Pacifica.


$15 at the door. Space is limited and reservations are recommended.

To reserve a space please send a check made out to Friends of Jung to:
Santa Barbara Friends of Jung ,c/o Lou Ann Wallner, M.F.T.
22 West Micheltorena Suite A, Santa Barbara, CA 93101

2 CEU’s for MFT’s and LCSW’s. - $10 processing fee for CEU’s

 

 

Santa Barbara Friends of Jung
Presents

“The World of Inner Images
and the Individuation Process
.”


with Sheherezad Shashaani, MFT
Wednesday April 16, 7:00-9:00 pm
Montecito Library, 1469 East Valley Rd, Montecito, CA.

Jung’s premise is that “everything of which we are conscious is an image, and that image is the psyche.” In this presentation, Sheherezad will share her reflections on how images from dreams, visions, and active imagination transform consciousness. Stories flow out of images, and she will explore ways in which the moon-world and sun-world come together. Sheherezad will demonstrate the process by which the inner life of imagination enables one’s own personal myth to become visible and known, leading to an understanding of the purpose and meaning of life.

Sheherezad Shashaani, MFT is a Jungian-oriented psychotherapist practicing in Santa Barbara, Ventura and Los Angeles. She was born and raised in Tehran, Iran. She received her B.A. In Child Development and Family Life from Purdue University in 1974 after which she returned to Iran and lived through the tumultuous Iranian revolution of 1979 and the Iraq war. In 1984 she returned to the United States and earned a B.A. in Music from UC Irvine. In 1992 she again returned to Iran where she taught piano and formed a group to study the works of C.G. Jung and Joseph Campbell. These studies stimulated a search for her archaic roots, and she began to travel extensively, visiting and studying ancient ruins and Persian mythology. In 1996, she returned to the United States and attended Pacifica Graduate Institute, where she earned her Master’s degree in Counseling Psychology with an emphasis in Depth Psychology.


$15 at the door. Space is limited and reservations are recommended.

To reserve a space please send a check made out to Friends of Jung to:
Santa Barbara Friends of Jung ,c/o Lou Ann Wallner, M.F.T.
22 West Micheltorena Suite A, Santa Barbara, CA 93101

2 CEU’s for MFT’s and LCSW’s. - $10 processing fee for CEU’s

click to download printable version

 


Santa Barbara Friends of Jung
Presents

“The Relationship to the Beloved in Dream
as an Expression of the Transcendent Function.”
A Special Valentine's Day Event


with Stephen Aizenstat, Ph.D.
Wednesday February 13, 7:00-9:00 pm
Montecito Library, 1469 East Valley Rd, Montecito, CA.

Stephen Aizenstat, Ph.D. is the founding president of Pacifica Graduate Institute and a licensed Clinical Psychologist. His areas of emphasis include depth psychology, dream research, and imaginal and archetypal psychology. Dr. Aizenstat’s original research centers on a psychodynamic process of “tending the living image”. He has conducted dreamwork seminars for over 25 years and has recorded “DreamTending”, a seven-hour CD. Dr. Aizenstat was also featured in a documentary film on DreamTending. His publications include: “Dreams are Alive” in Depth Psychology: Meditations in the Field, and “Nature Dreaming: Jungian Psychology and the World Unconscious” in Ecopsychology: Restoring the Earth, Healing the Mind. He is currently working on a new book, DreamTending: Teachings for a Dream-Centered Life. For more information on DreamTending visit www.dreamtending.com.


$15 at the door. Space is limited and reservations are recommended.

To reserve a space please send a check made out to Friends of Jung to:
Santa Barbara Friends of Jung ,c/o Lou Ann Wallner, M.F.T.
22 West Micheltorena Suite A, Santa Barbara, CA 93101

2 CEU’s for MFT’s and LCSW’s. - $10 processing fee for CEU’s

click to download printable version

 


An interview with Stephen Aizenstat

D is for Dream

The Santa Barbara Independent
Wednesday, December 13, 2006
By Martha Sadler

Pacifica's Stephen Aizenstat Sheds Light on Nighttime Visions

For this week’s Curioser and Curioser, Martha Sadler sat down for a chat with Stephen Aizenstat, the founder and president of Pacifica Graduate Institute, a co-founder of Earth Day, and an internationally respected expert on dreams. Aizenstat was recently named a Local Hero by The Independentfor decades of helping the community, but in this interview, we wanted to draw on his background in psychology and learn more about his field of professional expertise.

Hence, “D is for Dreams.”

Martha Sadler met Aizenstat earlier this week over warm drinks at the Coffee Bean and Tea Leaf on Coast Village Road in Montecito. The professor had just dropped off some chapters of his forthcoming book at the post office, and agreed to spend some of his valuable time answering Martha’s questions.

Aizenstat was thoughtful, sincere, and earnest in their hour-long talk, causing Martha to remark afterward: “He’s done dream-work with so many people that it’s amazing he’s still so enchanted with dreams.”

What follows is an edited transcript of their discussion. Thanks for reading, and see more of these columns here.

What are dreams?

Dreams are the spontaneous visions of the night. Some people say that when the eyes are closed, something else comes awake, and what comes awake at night are scenes from the day shaped by the imagination or shaped by the dreaming psyche.

Are they meaningful or just wacky entertainment?

Dreams may describe what is going on with us emotionally or existentially. They often present something going on in our world that we may have missed. Also, dreams are forever commenting on what's going on physiologically. They have a lot to say about our physical well-being: Dreams and images will occur first and then the symptom will always come second or third. Not only will dreams talk about what's going on, and where it goes on, they'll offer a diagnosis and something of a treatment plan, and in addition they'll give you a prognosis.

Does everybody dream?

Everybody dreams, and we dream about three or four times a night. Some people will remember their dreams frequently, but others have the hardest time remembering their dreams. They wake up and as soon as awake life comes in, dreams stop, and they can't remember a thing.

Can people learn to remember their dreams?

Remembering dreams is easily trained. There are hundreds of ways, but here are the top four that I've used all through the years. Number one is to get interested. If we get interested in dreams, they in turn get interested in us.

The second way is to take a dream journal, and pen or pencil, to your bedside, which is in itself a suggestion that, "Tonight I'm going to remember my dreams." Then you repeat that statement three times. "Tonight I'm going to remember my dreams," three times. And then the key is, before you get up in the morning, and the light rushes in, and you forget — to hang in that, what we call, liminal space, without movement, and without letting other things in, and waiting for some recall to occur.

If you're still not recollecting at that point, you take the dream journal with you to the kitchen or to the bathroom, and just give yourself that time, and within the hour or so, eight times out of 10, people remember their dream.

What if that doesn't work?

The third way is to remember the last dream that occurs to you. It may have been a year ago or five years ago, but write it down in the dream journal. For whatever reason, that stimulates recall.

And the fourth way?

The fourth way is to write to the dreaming psyche. So you say, "Dear dreaming psyche, this is Steve. I'm very interested in what you have to say. I truly am. I know it's been a long time but I am interested." Then you take the other side — just like you do in journal writing — you take the side of the dreaming psyche, and you say, "Steve, how long has it been? It's been, like, a year or two. In fact, you never ask, meshugena. You only ask when you want something." And so if you can get through the guilt, and if you use that dialogue back and forth, then you will increase the instance of dream recall.

It seems like dreams are often smarter, or certainly more imaginative, than waking life.

That's what's so phenomenal: Dreams come with a kind of intelligence that is beyond what's conscious. The psyche itself is rooted in an intelligence that is both instinctual by nature — the animal intelligence — and imaginative by nature, what Joseph Campbell or Carl Jung or any great poet or person of literature and the arts would identify as the archetypal or mythical imagination. At the same time, they are very much of this world.

But why are they organized so oddly?

There are lots of ways of explaining that, but somebody once said it's like the fool at the king or queen's court. They'll give the queen, or the king, the information. If you do it in a straight way, you might get your head cut off. But if you put it in riddle and rhyme, you get the information across without jeopardizing yourself.

So, the dreaming psyche will tell you what is so, but it will be guised often in language that is poetic, or symbolic or peculiar. In fact, the most peculiar dreams are often those that are most accurately representative of our uniqueness. A dream that is easily understood has usually already gone through a variety of what Freud called revision — it's already been homogenized by the culture.

Is there any hope for people with mundane dreams?

It’s a question that is always asked, about the mundane dreams. Those are the ones that we ordinarily dismiss, right? Oh my god, I want a big dream, like a big, grand, archetypal, mythological, imaginative dream. Instead I get this mundane daily housekeeping kind of thing that I've seen a million times and I'm bored and obviously I'm not worth much if that's all my dreams are — I hear all of this stuff.

So I decided to put that to the test one year. I worked on nothing but the daily housekeeping dreams — the ones I was certain were meaningless dreams, not as intriguing, inferior, inadequate. But they are a portal right into something.

In dreams, more than any other medium I know, the extraordinary shines through the ordinary. So I forever will say, take the ordinary and the extraordinary and work with both and see what happens. I also work with awake dreams, you can work with them in quite similar ways, because the psyche is activated.

How can you bring that sense of curiosity, wonder, and mystery that you talk about into daytime consciousness — without drugs?

That's what got me interested in dreams from the beginning, actually. Here I am, I'm a kid of the Vietnam era, drugs are going on all around me. That was the time — in the late ‘60s, early ‘70s — when things that altered consciousness were very popular: LSD, hallucinogens, mushrooms, and I was absolutely fascinated with extending consciousness from one realm to the next.

At the same time, I was watching and noticing that a lot of my buddies were not doing well on all of those drugs. They were getting in a lot of trouble physically, emotionally, in all kinds of ways.

But dreams will also take us to an altered state. They do anyway, every night. So it's, in a way, a organic, or natural way of exploring that quality of consciousness. To be in a dream at night and to work with a dream in the morning in a way is a practice that cultivates that curiosity and imagination.

Are dreams useful in a practical way?

Yes, because to reconnect with a dream opens you to an imaginative way of approaching the world, in all ways. I just got finished writing chapters on addiction, workplace, money, vocation, relationships. In all those areas dreams are very instructive and constructive. So whether I'm working at a company and listening in to that place as if it were a dream, or working with people in couples counseling and listening to dream, in all those areas, dreams have a lot to say about how we are in this world. Not because they give us the teaching necessarily, though they offer extraordinary information, but they offer new perspectives.

Remember, in the dream we're just one of many characters. The mistake is to imagine that we have dreamt that dream. In actuality, when we look into the dream, we see ourselves nine times out of 10 pictured in the dream, so then the question becomes: If we're in the dream, who's dreaming the dream?

So who's dreaming the dream?

That's where it gets very interesting, right? Somebody's dreaming the dream, and we’re in it, we're one of the many characters or figures in the dream — not to mention all the landscapes and emotions and the moods and everything like that — so there's another intelligence at work that moves through us, that we are part of. And it's an incredible intelligence that has our best interest at heart. To the extent that we care, or listen, or attend the dreams, they in turn will care for us.

What is the most amazing thing you know about dreams?

The things that for me have the greatest value are the things that make people's lives qualitatively better. Say I'm going to talk to the city council or if the county board of supes. I can go in there alone with my will power, with my sense of conviction, with everything I can muster in terms of leverage and influence, and one thing will happen. If I go in there and I bring with me a couple of companions from the dream time, I feel supported by the loving figures. Also, I’m not rocked bydifferent opinions because everybody in my dream time has a different opinion — so already I'm consulting with a diversity of opinions. Dreamwork provides a lot of resources and perspectives.

What else can you do with dreams, besides taking dream companions to city council with you?

A lot of people will get up in the morning and paint their dream. There are three ways to do that. One is to you can paint the whole dream as an entity, just as a whole scene; the second is to just do a storyboard where you paint different scenes on the page; and the third way is to take a particular image or a couple of images and allow them to come forward.

People in dream workshops over the years have become extraordinary artists that have showings all over the place as a result of bringing their dreams into the world through art. Ingmar Bergman, Einstein — that's where the theory of relativity came from, it's from a dream image — all those accounts in the Bible, Black Elk's speech. Inspiration comes from that intelligence that is outside of the construct of our egoic minds.

Keep up the conversation by leaving your comments below or emailing
Martha Sadler at Martha@independent.com
or by visiting Stephen Aizenstat’s website www.dreamtending.com

 

 

The Santa Barbara Friends of Jung is delighted to announce
a 2008 new membership “kick off” event!

Dr. Ross Woodman will be presenting on
“The Psyche and Romanticism”
February 17th, 2-5 pm.
Club Casa Mina - 620 Anacapa St. Unit C
(between Ortega and Cota Streets)

This will be a lovely gathering at a beautiful downtown location, giving us all a chance to meet each other and socialize as well as hear from Ross Woodman.

Those of you who attended Ross’s presentation last year for the Friends of Jung will know that this is really something not to be missed. Ross is an amazingly gifted speaker and teacher who brings the living spirit of poetry and depth psychology to his audiences.

Ross Woodman is Professor Emeritus at the University of Toronto where he taught for over forty years. His early book on the Apocalyptic vision in the poetry of Shelley was followed by numerous scholarly publications. In 1993 he received the “Outstanding Scholar” award from the Keats and Shelley Association of America. His latest book, “Sanity, Madness and Transformation: The Psyche in Romanticism” is an amazingly profound and stunningly crafted exposition on the origins of depth psychology in Romanticism that unites a deep understanding of Jung and a lifetime’s work in Romanticism with new developments in quantum physics and Jung’s relationship with Wolfgang Pauli.

This special event is only open to members of the Santa Barbara Friends of Jung.

This beautiful location in downtown Santa Barbara has street access. You can park very easily on the street or directly across the street at the Ortega Parking lot (entrance on Ortega). It is called Club Casa Mina. Walk through the white drive through, all the way in the back on the right. As of today, it can be recognized by the Obama headquarters on the street in front of the building.

It is free for all members. A membership form is attached to this email. Those who are not currently members may fill out this form and either bring a check for the membership dues with them to the event, or mail a check to:

Lou Ann Wallner
22 W. Micheltorena, Suite A
Santa Barbara, CA. 93101

Thank you for supporting the Santa Barbara Friends of Jung
and we hope to see you at this special gathering!


 


Santa Barbara Friends of Jung
Presents

“Alchemy of Melancholy”
Transforming Depression:
Healing the Soul Through Creativity

with David Rosen, M.D.
Saturday December 15, 7:00-9:00 pm
Montecito Library, 1469 East Valley Rd, Montecito, CA.


This presentation will cover: understanding depression and the quest for meaning, knowing suicide and its creative potential, and egocide and transformation (an innovative Jungian humanistic therapeutic paradigm). Egocide and transformation refers to the symbolic death of the destructive ego (shadow) and false self as well as subsequent creative expressions that lead to the birth of the true self. Dr. Rosen will discuss an actual case. The patient, guided by the therapist, analyzes to death or symbolically kills negative aspects of the ego and shadow (egocide and shadowcide) and the related depressive and suicidal state is transformed through the creative arts. Suicide is literally a dead end, whereas egocide involves a symbolic death and rebirth experience. Egocide and transformation allows the suffering melancholic individual to live, heal the soul through creativity, and find meaning in life.

David H. Rosen, M.D., a Jungian Analyst, is the holder of the McMillan Professorship in Analytical Psychology, Professor of Humanities in Medicine, and Professor of Psychiatry & Behavioral Science at Texas A&M University. He is the author of over ninety scholarly articles and eight books including The Healing Spirit of Haiku, co-authored with Joel Weishaus(North Atlantic Books, 2004); Transforming Depression: Healing the Soul Through Creativity (Nicolas-Hays, 2002); Evolution of the Psyche, co-authored with Michael Luebbert (Praeger, 1999); The Tao of Jung: The Way of Integrity (Penguin, 1997). See his website for more information:
http://psychology.tamu.edu/Faculty/Rosen/index.html.


$15 at the door. Space is limited and reservations are recommended.

To reserve a space please send a check made out to Friends of Jung to:
Santa Barbara Friends of Jung ,c/o Lou Ann Wallner, M.F.T.
22 West Micheltorena Suite A, Santa Barbara, CA 93101

2 CEU’s for MFT’s and LCSW’s. - $10 processing fee for CEU’s

click to download printable version

 


Santa Barbara Friends of Jung
Presents

“A Depth Psychological Approach to Spirituality"

with Dr. Lionel Corbett
October 24, 2007
at the Montecito Library

When our spirituality cannot be contained within traditional institutions, there is an urgent need for new ways to articulate our experience of the sacred. This lecture describes an approach to spirituality based on personal experience of the sacred, using the language of depth psychology rather than traditional theology. The lecture will draw on Jung’s religious writing on sacred experience and the emerging new God-image he described.

Dr. Corbett trained in medicine and psychiatry in England, and as a Jungian Analyst at the C.G. Jung Institute of Chicago. His primary dedication is to the religious function of the psyche, especially the way in which personal religious experience is relevant to individual psychology, and to the development of psychotherapy as a spiritual practice. He is the author of The Religious Function of the Psyche, Psyche and the Sacred, and the audio series Spirituality Beyond Religion. Dr. Corbett is on the faculty of Pacifica Graduate Institute, in Santa Barbara, California.


click to download printable version

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